Thursday 29th and Friday 30th June Ref: 2017/13

On the first day, I filled the water tank again after we had completed two large washing machine cycles and then dropped off the marina electronic quay and we were ready to go. Lady Martina was moored in quite a confined space but I expertly used both engines and the bow thruster to extract us which attracted not only interest but obvious admiration from the men working on the marina electrics and a few other spectators. We were the only boat in this ‘convoy’ and so took our time and got all three bridges to open in sequence as we made our way down the Orne canal and eventually moored at the Pegasus Bridge in the same spot as a few days ago.

On day two, we set off from Pegasus Bridge after lunch and found the river as quiet as yesterday. There was not very far to go but we cruised at 5 knots and were just pleased that the overnight gusts and winds had stopped and we enjoyed the views and trip and then had no trouble in pulling into the Ouistrehem Marina and mooring up at the visitor’s pontoon as their first arrival today. Others arrived later but by that time we had commissioned our folding bikes, cycled off to check out the ferry terminal for our arrangements for tomorrow’s crossing and then cycled back and along to the commercial yards for a very good look around an excellent chandlery; the best I had found in France so far this trip.

  • 1-Church-of-Saint-Pierre-viewed-from-Caen-castle-walls-other
  • Ranville Cemetery the resting place for over 2000 Normandy campaign casualties
  • 3-Chteau-de-Bnouville-near-Pegasus-Bridge

Whilst at Pegasus Bridge, I was interested in the nearby Ranville wartime cemetery, which was the resting place of over 2,000 soldiers who perished in the Normandy landings and the aftermath, including the young pilot who was the first to die when his glider crash landed in the first assault and the Lieutenant who was shot on Pegasus bridge when leading his assault pontoon as the first victim shot in action. I found out where the cemetery was and I cycled there.  It is a magnificent place and kept, as always by the Commonwealth War Grave Commission, in immaculate and beautiful condition. It is the resting place of over 2,000 soldiers who perished in the Normandy landings and the aftermath, including the young pilot who was the first to die when his glider crash landed in the first assault and the Lieutenant who was shot on Pegasus bridge when leading his assault pontoon as the first victim shot in action.

This day. we were offered a more protective mooring in a ‘box’ but I was quite happy alongside on the visitor’s pontoon and said I was quite happy if anyone needed to raft up against me during the week. We had another nice meal and I then prepared Lady Martina to be ready for her week of inactivity and also caught up with my writings, log-work and web sites before turning in for another very early morning’s journey! 

 

Day 1: Temp 22>24 deg C, RH 60>35%, Pressure 996 mb steady, rain, good viz, smooth and little wind inland <6knots SSWly

Day 2: Temp 22>28 deg C, RH 73>57%, Pressure 1013 mb steady, rain, good viz, smooth and breezy by coast <10knots Nly

Dutch Waterways

Inland Waterways of the Netherlands

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Broom Owners Club

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Journals of David A Broad

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